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Tiny House Toys: BeginAgain Puzzles

For Christmas, my cousin gave each of my girls a wooden block puzzle, and at first I felt a little trepidation about having another wooden puzzle with knobby pieces to step on or lose. Puzzles seem like a great toy for a tiny house, and we have a number of them and love them, but the wooden ones are usually so much harder to store, and the pieces always seem to get lost so easily around here. Plus, up until now, my girls haven't really been too interested in the wooden puzzles they've had. I went through about a year ago and purged most of their wooden puzzle collection because it rarely got played with, even when brand new.

These puzzles, though, are different. The pieces are big, but not too big, and they are a very nice quality. No glued on paper coating for my toddler to chew off. No knobby handles to step on in bare feet (though they still hurt if you land on one just right). And they are just enough of a challenge for my kids to actually enjoy playing with them.

Sunshine received a butterfly puzzle (Amazon link) with letters on it, and she's become a pro at assembling it, which she does over and over again. We had an empty drawer in our table, and we keep all of her pieces in a little box inside.

Sweetheart got this cat puzzle (Amazon link) that is adorable. It has both English and Spanish color names on it. She doesn't really put it together yet, but she likes playing with the pieces. We just leave them in the drawer, too.

The puzzles are part of the BeginAgain collection. BeginAgain is based in Colorado and specializes in designed eco-friendly toys that encourage imaginative play and creative learning.

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